Tag Archives: trees

8 Incredibly Helpful Tips to Grow Fruit Trees in Containers

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Before you go out and buy all your supplies, you need to plan on what type of tree you want to plant. Do your shopping between late January and early March, as this is the best time to get the healthiest trees. You can try your hand at apple trees or any other dwarf plant such as peaches or nectarines. Fig trees work too. When you choose to buy, make sure it’s from a reputable source. You don’t want to get a sick and unhealthy tree.

The container is going to be incredibly important because it determines how well your tree’s root system grows. You want one that is at least 18 inches in diameter. 20 inches or more is usually best, though. The material can be anything you want: terracotta, plastic, wood, or whatever. Just make sure it’s sturdy, has good drainage, and is big enough.

Because your tree won’t be getting nutrients from the actual ground, you need to make sure you’re using high quality soil. Don’t use gardening soil because it’s too heavy and can cause drainage problems. You’ll also want to find nutrient mixes and fertilizers that your tree may need in order to grow best. Talk to your local nursery or wherever you bought the tree.

Before planting, cut and trim any roots that look damaged or that are too long. If you don’t, they can cause damage down the road that will be a lot harder to fix once the tree is in the pot. The beginning is a much easier time to nip these problems in the bud.

When your tree is planted and in the pot, don’t forget to prune it. This is really important because your tree will need as much energy as possible to bear the best fruit. Fruit usually grows at the tips and tops of trees, so keep that in mind.

Be weather aware when it comes to potted plants. Because you can move the pot, this should help you keep the plant alive. During good weather, put it where it will grow best (usually in full sun). When it’s cold and in the winter, you’ll want to move the plant indoors or to the garage or shed.

Watering is one of the most important things you can do to help a potted tree survive. Usually, you’ll want to water twice a week. If it’s really hot, you may need to water daily. Don’t just rely on the rain because the pot doesn’t have enough surface area to provide the plant all the water it needs.

In order to keep the tree healthy, you’ll want to have a stake, trellis, or some other support system. If not, the tree will easily slant to the side or grow in an odd direction. Do this when the tree is first planted because fixing it down the right will be a NIGHTMARE!

10 of the Fastest Growing Shade Trees for Your Yard

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Northern Red Oak. This tree prefers soil that is moist, well-drained, and acidic. When possible, plant it somewhere it can get full sunlight. When in ideal locations, this tree can grow up to 75 feet tall, providing your home with plenty of shade.

Freeman Maple. This tree is very well known for its amazing fall colors. It grows best in zones 4-7, so just remember that. At its best, this tree will be around 80 feet high and nearly 50 feet wide. Not too shabby for a fast-growing tree.

Tulip Trees. Known for their flowers, this tree is anything but small and delicate. Tulip trees need a LOT of space to grow, so they’re not meant for a small yard. Avoid planting them near patios; it needs an open yard to be truly appreciated. You can definitely dine or hang out underneath it, though.

Leyland Cypress Tree. Something I like about this tree is that it can be used for shade or as a privacy fence. Many owners will use it for both. It grows best in zones 6-10, but it can also survive in zone 5 if you know what you’re doing.

Green Vase Zelkova. I love the shape of this tree. The way it arches up and out is mesmerizing. It can get up to 70 feet high and nearly 45 feet wide. Plant this tree in full sun, but it can survive in a variety of soils. The leaves are great colors, ranging from dark green to maroon. It’s also a pretty hardy tree, which is great.

Royal Empress. Once this tree gets full grown, you’ll know why it’s called a Royal Empress. The purple leaves are incredibly majestic, but they also provide some great shade. Make sure you want such a unique tree in your yard before you plant it.

River Birch. If you ask anyone who knows me, they’ll tell you that birch trees are my favorite. I just love their bark and the sound they make in the wind. River Birch is no exception, with great bark and fantastic foliage, especially in the fall. If you plant this, just keep it away from septic tanks.

Sawtooth Oak. This is one of many oak trees that are fast-growing and great for shade. In fact, most oak trees can be planted, but I like this one in particular. It grows fast, and it thrives best in zones 5-9.

Weeping Willow. You can’t talk about shade trees without mentioning the famous Weeping Willow. It can grow anywhere from 3 to 8 feet a year. Fantastic! While it grows best near water, some newer hybrids can thrive in other places as well.

American Sycamore. This gorgeous tree can grow up to 6 feet in one year. If you’re looking for a fast-growing tree to give you as much shade as possible, then this is the tree for you.